Process of the Month- ITAM Review

Happy New Year one and all!  I hope you have made your New Year’s resolutions and are sticking to them with gusto!

For my part I am walking 10,000 steps a day and not adding sugar to my tea or coffee.  I’m not even a week into this, and my shirts don’t seem as snug nor am I suffering from sugar withdrawal symptoms as I thought I might be.  I’ve even put my name down for the Ealing half-marathon at the end of September (that should give me enough time to come up with some excuses!)

As we get back into the swing of things, I wanted to draw your attention to the Process of the Month feature I have been writing for ITAM Review.  To date, the following processes have been published:

Software Re-harvesting Process

Software Change Management Process

Corporate Governance Process

Maintain a Supported Catalogue Process

I’m thankful to say that the processes have been well received to date, and I hope got a few people thinking about how to apply their Software Asset Management systems to their Software Asset Management framework to gain the best knowledge possible from them, and so inform the business as to where they stand with their license position.

The most recent process on offer is the Software Rationalisation Process.  Again, we step back from the font-4 license for a moment, and consider the software and it role within the company, but compared to equivalent software already installed on the IT estate.  Just how many PDF readers does a company need?  How many versions, editions and releases of MS Visio are called for? Is their a compelling argument to upgrade to Oracle 12c?  These are just some of the questions that can be asked, justified and documented.  This is a really useful process to keep the proliferation of software titles in check, and so assist the helpdesk in not having to support every software title under the sun.

To read more, click on the link below:

Software Rationalisation Process

 

 

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